Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Must see, must hear....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Must see, must hear....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqhNPY882kE
    ________________________________________________
    "Call me late, just don't call me late for dinner."-Checker Flag Bubba

  • #2
    Thank you !

    Jalalud'din Rumi is one of the world’s most revered mystical poets. During his lifetime he produced a prolific range of inspiring and devotional poetry which encapsulates the sufi's experience of union with the divine.

    Rumi has become one of our most popular poets. Although Rumi was a Sufi and a great scholar of the Qu’ran his appeal reaches across religious and social divisions. Even during his lifetime he was noted for his cosmopolitan outlook.

    Rumi was born in 1207 on the Eastern shores of the Persian Empire. It was a period of remarkable social and political turbulence. The 13th Century was the era of the crusades; also the area where Rumi lived was under constant threat of Mongol invasion. The great upheavals Rumi faced during his life is said to have influenced much of his poetry.

    The most important turning point in Rumi’s life was when he met the wandering dervish Shams al- Din. Shams was eccentric and unorthodox, but was filled with heart - felt devotion, that sometimes he couldn’t contain. Shams appeared to be quite different to the respectable and prestigious scholar, (as Rumi was at that point.) However Rumi saw in Shams a divine presence. This meeting and their close mystical relationship was instrumental in awakening Rumi’s latent spirituality and intense devotion. It was at this point Rumi abandoned his academic career and began to write his mystical poetry.

    Rumi’s poetry is wide ranging and encompasses many different ideas but behind all the poetry the essential theme was the longing and searching for the union with the divine. Rumi was himself a great mystic. His outpourings of poetry were a reflection of his own inner consciousness. Ironically Rumi said that no words could adequately explain the experience of mystical union. Yet his words are inspiring signposts which point towards the divine.

    In his poetry Rumi frequently uses imagery which may be unexpected. For example although Islam forbids alcohol, he often describes the sensation of being "drunk and intoxicated with ecstasy for his beloved." Here drunk implies the bliss of the divine consciousness. Love is a frequent subject of Rumi's poems, descriptions of seeming romantic love is an illusion to the all encompassing pure, divine love.


    Do You Love Me?
    - Rumi -

    A lover asked his beloved,
    Do you love yourself more
    than you love me?

    The beloved replied,
    I have died to myself
    and I live for you.

    I’ve disappeared from myself
    and my attributes.
    I am present only for you.

    I have forgotten all my learning,
    but from knowing you
    I have become a scholar.

    I have lost all my strength,
    but from your power
    I am able.

    If I love myself
    I love you.
    If I love you
    I love myself.

    Comment

    Working...
    X