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Introduction to "Strange Tales and Wondrous Legends"

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  • Introduction to "Strange Tales and Wondrous Legends"

    Greetings Everyone and Happy New Year!

    In his introduction to the second volume of his book, "Strange Tales and Marvelous Legends," Doctor Dahesh mentions that he gives it the title "Thirty Five Stories by Dr. Dahesh" and that it complements the first volume.

    Right off the bat, Dahesh writes that the stories dealing with the subject of reincarnation are not imaginary.

    He says that he believes in reincarnation as surely as he believes in his own existence. He provides a succinct definition of reincarnation which basically is "man's repeated return to Earth in order to cleanse himself of impurities and absolve himself of his sins."

    Then he evokes the Old Testament and in particular the book of Exodus and he points out that the judges would judge a piece of stone if it was the cause behind the death of a man! We learn that the judges would order the destruction of the stone by pounding until it became (literally) dust in the wind!

    He then evokes the fact that (in those days) a man copulating with an animal would make both man and beast subject to penalty.

    Then Dahesh asks: "How then is it possible to pass judgment over beasts and inorganic bodies that do not reason, if the judges did not believe that their were responsible for their acts as any human being, because they fully realize their responsibility when they commit a criminal act." (Therefore, and as the stories would later show, beast as well as inorganic bodies DO in fact reason!)

    (To be continued )
    Last edited by Mario; 01-03-2007, 01:03 PM.
    "Fail, to succeed."

  • #2
    Introduction Expanded (Work in progress)

    In his introduction to the second volume of his book, "Strange Tales and Marvelous Legends," Doctor Dahesh mentions that he gives it the title "Thirty Five Stories by Dr. Dahesh" and that it complements the first volume.

    Right off the bat, Dahesh writes that the stories dealing with the subject of reincarnation are not imaginary.

    He says that he believes in reincarnation as surely as he believes in his own existence. He provides a succinct definition of reincarnation which basically is "man's repeated return to Earth in order to cleanse himself of impurities and absolve himself of his sins."

    Then he evokes the Old Testament and in particular the book of Exodus and he points out that the judges would judge a piece of stone if it was the cause behind the death of a man! We (those of us not familiar with that book—and, some of us are Buddhists!) learn that the judges would order the destruction of the stone by pounding until it became (literally) dust in the wind!

    He then evokes the fact that (in those days) a man copulating with an animal would make both man and beast subject to penalty.

    Then Dahesh asks: "How then is it possible to pass judgment over beasts and inorganic bodies that do not reason, if the judges did not believe that their were responsible for their acts as any human being, because they fully realize their responsibility when they commit a criminal act."

    (Therefore, and as the stories would later show, beast as well as inorganic bodies DO in fact reason!)

    Then Dahesh talks about Jesus Christ, "The Founder of Christianity," and he cites the episode in which his disciples asked whether the prophet Elijah as per the prophecies. His reply was that Elijah had already returned to Earth and that he was known as "John The Baptist." John was decapitated by order of Herod, "The Tyrant," fulfilling the request of the "shameless" Herodia (his stepdaughter, and whose mother was denounced by John because she —the mother—would marry Herod. Herod was therefore Herodia's stepfather, his brother was Herodia's father).

    "And if ye will receive it, this is Elias, which was for to come" said Christ of John the Baptist when the disciples asked about him. (Mathew 11 : 14)

    Then the Doctor cites the following event:

    When Christ healed the blind man, his disciples asked him "Master, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?"

    And Jesus answered, "Neither hath this man sinned, nor his parents : but that the works of God should be manifest in him." (John 9 : 1 - 3)

    According to Doctor Dahesh, in the time of Jesus Christ the Jews believed in reincarnation as proven in the gospel of Mark.
    "Others said, that it is Elias, and others said that it is a prophet, or as one of the prophets. But when Herod heard thereof, he said, it is John who I beheaded : he is risen from the dead. " (Mark 6 : 15 -16)

    Dahesh then says that it is certainly unjust for a child to be born blind or crippled in any way, through no fault of his own, unless...we know that this child was guilty of serious offenses in a previous existence. Given those circumstances, we would then realize that he justly deserves his punishment and the justice of God is clearly revealed to us.

    Editor's note: I would like to point out something important to those readers who might say "yes, but all of these beliefs assume the arrow of time points in only one direction." In other words, that these arguments are limited to a Newtonian view of the Universe.

    In Daheshism, the concept of multiple dimensions does exist. In other words, past, present, future, all possible scenarios, exist simultaneously. However, I for one have a hard time considering the concept of a fourth dimension introduced by Einstein and the sort of impact it has on my existence, let alone thinking in terms of a 5th, 6th, etc. dimension and all the associated ramifications.

    By the way, the "fourth dimension" is that of "Time."

    Time, as Einstein has postulated, and as was later proven, is not absolute. In simple terms: 2 people (using identical frames of reference to describe their world) watching the same event unfold, can see 2 different versions of reality and be both right!

    But, we can't talk about Einstein's universe before understanding Newtonian physics.

    However, one must be prepared to the inevitable eventuality that, as our knowledge of the way the (observed) universe functions (as described in Quantum Physics for example) we might come to some stumbling blocks as our "beliefs" and "science" no longer "mesh"...
    unless we are able to let go of some of our biases and accept that we humans, and regardless of how sophisticated our measuring equipments get, can never fully comprehend the way the universe functions, and that is why we see a semblance of a lack of reconciliation between what we believe and what seems to be.

    Case in point, the following paradox: GOD is all-knowing and omnipotent, and man could never in his wildest dreams imagine thinking anything that GOD has not already foretold he would... (please ponder that for a moment). Now, on the other hand, GOD gives man "FREE WILL."

    By definition, "FREE WILL" means that man can (quite literally) surprise GOD and put GOD in a reactive mode.

    That concept (please humor me) is not acceptable in Daheshism. Daheshists believe that their creator knows the past, present and future. Daheshists also believe that their creator gives them FREE CHOICE.

    If one truly takes the time to ponder the two "sides" of the equation, he or she would see that there is a "correction" missing.

    In fact, and historically speaking, Newtonian Physics was on the brink of destruction because of the discovery that regardless of how fast we travelled relative to a beam of light (comprised of photons) that beam of light maintained the same velocity.

    Then, the assumption was that TIME was absolute. Einstein would save the day and introduce the notion that, no, TIME IS RELATIVE. In other words, the reason a particle traveling at the speed of light (and unlike an oncoming train or car) ALWAYS seemed to have the SAME constant speed (wether we were traveling away from it or towards it) was because our dimension (which until then was defined by ONLY the x, y, and z axes ) needed another variable to CORRECT the fact that a DISTORTION occurs to our sensation of time (even though we NEVER feel it), when things go very fast. In fact, hadn't it been for Einstein, Appolo 11 (if only based on the UNCORRECTED calculations using Newton's formulas) would have MISSED the moon!

    My point? To begin scratching the surface of the Daheshist principles (if that is one's wish, of course) going beyond the realm of Newtonian representation/interpretation of the universe is primordial.

    Perhaps one day, we will have the kind of measuring and observation tools that will detect tangible existence of other dimensions (parallel, or not, to our own) and what happens when these dimensions intersect with ours.


    Dahesh then declares the following: " The Christian world must therefore believe in reincarnation and the repeated return of a human being to Earth until he expiates for his sins. After that he moves on to a distant happy sphere leaving the Earth behind with its endless evils."

    Then the Doctor turns his attention to Islam. According to him, Reincarnation is also recognized by Islam and is "confirmed by my many verses from the Koran."

    In the surah of the Cow (28) it says : "How disbelieve ye in Allah when ye are dead and we gave life to you! Then we will give you death, then life again, and then unto him ye will return."

    In the surah of the Cleaving ( 86) we read: " O man! What hath made thee careless concerning thy Lord, the Bountiful. Who created thee, then fashioned, then proportioned thee? Into whatsoever born He will, He casteth thee."

    And in the surah of the Believer (11) : " They say Our Lord! Twice hast thou made us die and twice hast thou made us live. Now we confess our sins, is there any way to go out?"

    From the surah of the The Event (60) we have : “We mete out death among you, and We are not to be outrun, That We may transfigure you and make you what ye know not.”

    And again in the surah of the Table Spread : " Shall I tell thee of a worse case than theirs for retribution with Allah? Worse is the case of him who Allah hath cursed, him upon whom His wrath has fallen and whose sort Allah has turned to apes and swine, and serveth idols. Such are in worse plight and further astray from the plain road."

    Then Dahesh talks about the Buddhist religion (which means that Daheshism recognized Buddha as a prophet) and he says: " The Buddhist religion confirms the theory of reincarnation beyond a doubt. Its founder Buddha relates that he had gone through several reincarnations. In one of the them he was a rabbit and he had offered himself to be eaten by a lion. The Hindu religion of the Indians rests on reincarnation. That is the reason why they keep waving fans as they proceed through the forests. By this means they propose to drive away any insects that may be in their way for fear of inflicting harm upon them."

    Dahesh tells us that the Hindu believe that these insects are creatures who were once human and that their offensive conduct earned them to be born again as insects, animals, or birds, depending of their conduct in their previous lives.

    (Editor's note: I once asked the Doctor if Animals had prophets. He smiled, shook his head and said "lets' not get started on that subject."

    (To be continued)
    Last edited by Mario; 01-03-2007, 01:15 PM.
    "Fail, to succeed."

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    • #3
      Buddhist religion

      Originally posted by Mario View Post
      Then Dahesh talks about the Buddhist religion (which means that Daheshism recognized Buddha as a prophet) and he says: " The Buddhist religion confirms the theory of reincarnation beyond a doubt. Its founder Buddha relates that he had gone through several reincarnations. In one of the them he was a rabbit and he had offered himself to be eaten by a lion. The Hindu religion of the Indians rests on reincarnation. That is the reason why they keep waving fans as they proceed through the forests. By this means they propose to drive away any insects that may be in their way for fear of inflicting harm upon them."
      That contradicts when Dahesh was asked if Buddha knew his past lives .

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      • #4
        May I ask you to expand on that?

        Who asked Dahesh, when, etc.

        Also, was this printed anywhere?

        Thank you.

        M.
        "Fail, to succeed."

        Comment


        • #5
          humans reincarnate

          I read that Dr dahesh taught people that humans reincarnate .
          Animals can see their past lives . Stories of reincarnation of a dog that knew his past live as a human , etc exists in dahesh stories . But Dr dahesh said that by God mercy this knowledge of past lifes is concealed with humans .
          I dont remember where , but i read that someone asked Dr dahesh if Buddha knew his past lives . Dr dahesh said : Buddha was a great spiritual leader, but he did not have the ability to see his past lives

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          • #6
            Well, my dear "Sonic," it is absolutely crucial that you remember where you read it and who wrote it, isn't it?

            The reference I am using—albeit an unpublished translation that I have in my posession given to me by one the inheritors of the Dahesh estate, sometime around 1986, to review and compare to the original Arabic text, which I still have—clearly states the opposite. However, it does not necessarily suggest that Buddha had the power to see all his past lives...and there could have been many (and if you read the other post I added called "In Doctor Dahesh's own words..." he writes that we can reincarnate up to 6000 times!)

            But let's assume that you read it and that what you are saying in factual and that Buddha—similarly to his fellow human beings— did not have the ability to see his past lives:

            Since Buddha was a prophet, isn't it possible, logical, conceivable, that he might have had a vision or a revelation about that event?

            Not unless we can prove that Buddha was not a prophet and that Dahesh clearly indicated that he was not a prophet.

            Everything I read indicates that he was.

            And since we know that prophets are guided by visions, so, logic dicates that we can accept the notion that Buddha was able to see this particular episode in his existence—as it might have been revealed to him.

            M.
            Last edited by Mario; 01-06-2007, 09:13 PM.
            "Fail, to succeed."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sonic View Post
              I read that Dr dahesh taught people that humans reincarnate . Animals can see their past lives . Stories of reincarnation of a dog that knew his past live as a human , etc exists in dahesh stories . But Dr dahesh said that by God mercy this knowledge of past lifes is concealed with humans.
              If I recall correctly, and I believe it was in "Memoirs of a Dinar" by Dr. Dahesh, of which I do not have a copy, so I cannot confirm this (I say "I think" it was, because I have only read pieces of a small handful of Dr. Dahesh's writings in english...) it was written if I remember correctly, that yes, some animals do have the ability to see and understand their past lives... but I also recall, that this was not an absolute... not ALL animals were allowed to know their past lives... and this was not based upon the species of the animal... it was based upon spiritually that which that particular animal or entity merited.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Johnson View Post
                If I recall correctly, and I believe it was in "Memoirs of a Dinar" by Dr. Dahesh, of which I do not have a copy, so I cannot confirm this (I say "I think" it was, because I have only read pieces of a small handful of Dr. Dahesh's writings in english...) it was written if I remember correctly, that yes, some animals do have the ability to see and understand their past lives... but I also recall, that this was not an absolute... not ALL animals were allowed to know their past lives... and this was not based upon the species of the animal... it was based upon spiritually that which that particular animal or entity merited.
                I just finished "Memoirs of a Dinar." Interestingly enough, when I was through, I dreamt about nuclear-like explosions in vials and searching a warehouse for nuclear weapons. There is really no talk about past lives in the book. However, the donkeys do comment that they are glad God made them donkeys instead of humans due to the crimes humans commit and humans' lust and unsatiable desire for gold and money.

                I remember reading about the animals remembering past lives as well...

                It discusses it here: http://daheshism.com/spiritualjustice.html

                There is the episode in "Born Again With Dr. Dahesh" by Salim Onbargi where a man is transformed or "reincarnated" into a dog (p. 160).

                I remember reading the story about Dr. Dahesh visiting his soulmate, a princess, who happened to be much younger than him. The princess had a servant who was cheating on her husband. Later, the servant is killed by her husband upon his finding out through her son talking in his sleep. The servant reincarnates into a black cat and her son is born as one of her kittens which she kills soon after his birth.

                I can't remember exactly where I read this story. I flipped through the afore mentioned book because I thought I had read it there, but could not spot it. I should read "Born Again" again to remember more of the details.
                Last edited by WingedPaladin; 12-23-2007, 05:31 AM.

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                • #9
                  Hi Winged... it sounds like your dreams have been very active as of late. I trust you can see this as a positive experience for you... strangely enough, not all "scary" dreams are necessarily bad... sometimes the shock of them awakens something within us to see something that we might not have otherwise seen had we just been softly nudged. Sometimes (I think) they also prepare us and give us a sense of hope too... I hope you are well.

                  I am sorry I left my previous thought kind of hanging up in the air. How wonderful that you were able to read "Memoirs of a Dinar"! I had the opportunity to read a rough English transcript of it sometime around 1990 or so. Yes, I remember about the donkeys talking to one another... rather humorous in some ways but also so very poignant.

                  The other English transcript I had read around the same time was excerpts from “Strange Stories and Wonderful Tales”. I only had a few hours with each so I am delving deep in to the fading memory banks on my statement that some, (based on merit or what was best for them) not all animals knew what their past lives consisted of. Maybe someone who has this book can help me out.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Couples of notes...

                    Originally posted by WingedPaladin View Post
                    I just finished "Memoirs of a Dinar." Interestingly enough, when I was through, I dreamt about nuclear-like explosions in vials and searching a warehouse for nuclear weapons. There is really no talk about past lives in the book. However, the donkeys do comment that they are glad God made them donkeys instead of humans due to the crimes humans commit and humans' lust and unsatiable desire for gold and money.

                    I remember reading about the animals remembering past lives as well...

                    It discusses it here: http://daheshism.com/spiritualjustice.html

                    There is the episode in "Born Again With Dr. Dahesh" by Salim Onbargi where a man is transformed or "reincarnated" into a dog (p. 160).

                    I remember reading the story about Dr. Dahesh visiting his soulmate, a princess, who happened to be much younger than him. The princess had a servant who was cheating on her husband. Later, the servant is killed by her husband upon his finding out through her son talking in his sleep. The servant reincarnates into a black cat and her son is born as one of her kittens which she kills soon after his birth.

                    I can't remember exactly where I read this story. I flipped through the afore mentioned book because I thought I had read it there, but could not spot it. I should read "Born Again" again to remember more of the details.
                    On the subject of Reincarnation:

                    It is worthwhile to note that "Memoirs of a Dinar" was written decades
                    before any unequivocal evocation of the term "Reincarnation" is
                    presented to the public-at-large by Doctor Dahesh in his "Strange
                    Stories and Wondrous Legends"
                    4-part series.

                    Therefore, it could be argued that Doctor Dahesh was instructed (by the
                    Spirit who had the advantage of being able to transcend time and
                    space...and was acting as his "navigator")
                    to introduce the concept in
                    stages.

                    Arguably, very few of those who first laid eyes on these passages already
                    believed in — or perhaps even identified with — the notion of
                    reincarnation.

                    After all, reincarnation was a concept that belonged in the
                    non-Christians, non-Muslims, and non-Jews realm.

                    Or was it?

                    Anyone willing to go one step further beyond what they were taught to
                    believe and re-read certain passages in the Bible (old and new
                    testaments)
                    and The Koran with — dare we suggest — a different
                    perspective, could easily argue that these Holy Books do in fact evoke
                    the subject, albeit with subtlety.

                    Today, and decades after the first clear and unequivocal reference to Reincarnation by Doctor Dahesh, Daheshism cannot be dissociated from Reincarnation.

                    However, the question we must ask ourselves is this: Shouldn't the contemporary discussion of Reincarnation be brought up to date?

                    Our argument is as follows:

                    When Doctor Dahesh first introduced the concept of Reincarnation,
                    people were not really used to hearing about multi-dimensional
                    universes, matter versus anti-matter, and (lest we forget) relativistic
                    physics.

                    Today, and even though the average person doesn't really know what any
                    of those important tenants of physics mean in terms of his or her own
                    life, just about anyone who has ever watched such popular series as "Start Trek" has heard of "tachyons" and... of course... the Wormholes.

                    Interestingly, many Daheshists (we've heard) will clearly say that every person has spiritual fluids in higher worlds as well as lower worlds (hence the origin of the "inner battle") and that the past, present, and future all exist and that time is an illusion. Those same aforementioned "Many Daheshists" also will tell you that such and such person has a spiritual fluid (or fluids) from this AND that animal (or insect...) as well as from this and that person...

                    In other words, we don't simply (and in all totality) reincarnate from
                    one state into another.

                    If that was the case, and if it was that simple, then why do we even
                    need to discuss Daheshism?

                    Meaning...

                    Why not call it "Buddhism?"

                    And what makes the Daheshist perspective an update to the Buddhist view?

                    In our experience (gathered over the years) an "educated" Daheshist faced with that fundamental question gives the following (and very valid) answer (which we have taken the liberty of paraphrasing):
                    "Well, it's kind of like what the Buddhist say, but the true concept of Reincarnation is far more complex than that and would require a lot of study and reflection... "
                    Otherwise, and taken at face value, one might well argue that the concept of reincarnation in Daheshism is not that much different from the one we learn about in Buddhism — and, incidentally, and according to Doctor Dahesh himself, Buddha was a PROPHET* and not merely a "spiritual guide." Please see footnote (*) below.
                    On the subject of being reincarnated from animals or vice versa:

                    We need a balanced view.

                    Chances are, and one never knows, that cat, dog, or...frog, could be here to save one's life.
                    True Story: One time someone commented to the Doctor that a cat was now worth several hundred dollars because of the vet bill.

                    The cat was struck by a car, and nearly died.

                    The Doctor's response was "on the contrary, that cat is priceless."

                    The cat had put himself in the path of the car in order to save others.

                    Yes, perhaps the entity was "demoted" to the level of cat... But
                    knowing that there infinite possibilities and hidden truths should
                    cause a person to feel apathy and not ... and potentially...condescension.

                    Let it be known that Doctor Dahesh once traveled to Canada to reclaim a
                    cat.
                    But let's go back to the issue of "Subtlety."

                    The Doctor wrote the story of a mother who threw her two children to
                    the wolves in order to save her own life. In another story, we see two wolves attacking and killing a young
                    bride...

                    It is clear that the boy and girl who were eaten by the wolves
                    reincarnated as wolves not as punishment but to deliver justice.

                    But, why did the boy and girl merit (in the first place) to be thrown
                    to the wolves? Chances are (and because everything that happens, happens for a reason dictated by Divine Justice) and whether at the hand of the criminal mother
                    — who chose to save her own life at the expense of her children's — or
                    by other unfortunate chain of events, the boy and girl were going to
                    face and awful, horrible, and atrocious end. That outcome, was perhaps, inevitable.

                    The mother could have averted this fate by placing
                    herself in the face of danger and not resort to throwing her children
                    into the mouths of the wolves.

                    But why was the mother chased by the wolves in the first place?

                    Most probably we might never find the ultimate origins of the "forces" that sparked the vicious cycle leading to these chain of events in THAT particular space/time frame.

                    At the end of the day we must reach the following conclusion:

                    The answer is not important. God have mercy on each and every one of us.

                    That is the only way we learn to unlearn the natural tendency to JUDGE
                    and speak in terms of BLACK AND WHITE and make it sound as if Divine
                    Justice is automatically synonymous with PUNISHMENT.

                    Only REVELATION can confirm if anything in punishment.

                    As we have seen, the Donkeys themselves prefer to remain Donkeys.

                    And which is better: a child dying in a concentration camp from hunger,
                    disease, and despair or an Eagle who soars high above the skies of the
                    aforementioned camp?

                    There is a story written by Doctor Dahesh in which a Dog asks to become a man... and regrets having done so and begs God to be made into a dog once again.

                    "Truth" is often like a steep mountain that no one can climb unless
                    he or she are willing to risk falling and suffering great pain in the
                    process.

                    But, let us imagine the rewards we get when we are able to reach the
                    top of the mountain and a whole new perspective is given to us,
                    including the ability to see other mountains, far ahead, and otherwise
                    invisible to us from the ground.

                    What is the meaning of life—at its core— if not to continue in the
                    pursuit of knowledge for its own sake?

                    Isn't that why Doctor Dahesh loved to read so much? If he couldn't
                    learn anything from books, then why did he read them? And what good is
                    knowledge if it does not cause us to think about the subtleties?

                    These subtleties, and going back to the analogy of the mountain, are
                    the steps we build — for ourselves and the future generations to come.

                    Without thinking about the subtleties — for example— "Divine Justice"
                    becomes synonymous with "Punishment." (And that is why, perhaps, BoxFox asked this question...)

                    How many Daheshists out there think to themselves:

                    "Oh, this person is blind? That's gotta to be punishment"

                    And to put it more bluntly: how many out there consider anything
                    (seemingly disastrous, such as an illness or accident) that happens to
                    anyone they dislike (for their own individual reasons) as punishment,
                    whereas anything that befalls a love one is a badge of merit?

                    Only God knows what those same Daheshists think when they see a Dog...

                    In the summary whose link is provided above by Winged Paladin, we couldn't help noticing this rather bold statement:

                    "However, is it reasonable for God, Almighty to withhold his answer from the devout thinkers and believers? No, for God inspired the answer to the great philosophers, such as Pythagoras and Plato: human beings return to life on earth in many reincarnations and in situations directly related to the individual’s behavior and deeds."

                    Our question is: Is it reasonable for mere man or woman to ponder what may or may not constitute as being a reasonable act on the part of God, Almighty?

                    What God chooses to do or not do has nothing to do with man's conception and understanding of the "reasonable."

                    Doctor Dahesh told Mario Henri Chakkour this popular folk tale:

                    There was once a rich king who wanted to wipe out poverty in his kingdom and refused to accept the notion that God is the one who ultimately chooses who is poor and who is wealthy.

                    And so it was, the king eradicated poverty, or so he thought...

                    One day, and while he was visiting a nearby village, he spotted — to his horror—a poor man. He became upset and declared to the man:" I will make you wealthy!"

                    And so the King took the man to vast open field he owned and gave the poor man a large pebble and said to him: " Throw it as hard as you can. Wherever this pebble lands will mark the perimeter of the land you shall own and cultivate!"

                    The poor man was ecstatic and flung the pebble as hard as he could!

                    So hard and powerful was his throw that the pebble disappeared from view, only to reappear and strike the poor man in the head, thus killing him on the spot.

                    The poor man fell to the ground. When he opened his fist, a piece of paper rolled out. The king grabbed it and read the message from God:

                    "I made him poor, you made him wealthy."

                    "I took away his life, [now, let me see] you give it back to him!"

                    Dare we ask what is reasonable or not reasonable for God to choose to do after a story such as this?

                    Lastly, and a minor note: The Story is "BLACK ZOLA" which you will
                    also find in "Lights Upon Dr. Dahesh and Daheshism."

                    It wasn't the Doctor Dahesh who was born in 1909, but one of his
                    incarnations. And, on that note, and since we don't know how much of
                    him was in fact in that that "Man of Mysteries" we will leave that
                    open. Perhaps, (and as we have seen in another post) Fluid 20 had to
                    remain on Earth for 20 centuries. Did that Fluid split and materialize
                    in several entities, including animals? We don't know. What have heard
                    was that Doctor Dahesh incarnated was, at some point, a lion.

                    Perhaps animals do have prophets.

                    When Mario Henri Chakkour asked Doctor Dahesh that question, Doctor
                    Dahesh did not say no. He simply smiled and said "Let's not get into
                    it..." and he went back to writing.

                    =================

                    Footnote *: Yes, being a "spiritual guide" is already a rare and wonderful thing. But we are merely repeating what Doctor Dahesh himself wrote in his piece called "Bubbles"

                    Here is the excerpt:

                    The memory of those whose name was entered in history as being great vanishes, and with it immediately disappears with it this false greatness, when the name of JESUS or MOHAMMAD or MOSES or BUDDHA is mentioned, those prophets and guides and founders of the Religions, who preached brotherhood.


                    Therefore, and from this piece written in

                    Djibouti, November 17, 1970
                    12:30 P.M.

                    makes it clear that BUDDHA is a prophet, and guide, and founder of a religion.

                    Soon, we will also be discussing the mention of GANDHI as a PROPHET, especially in the third volume of "Strange Tales and Wondrous Legends" (incidentally, "Wondrous" is a more apt translation than "Wonderful" because in Arabic the word is "3AJEEB" from which the word "3AJEEBAT" comes, and which means "Miracle." In arabic, we can use the adjective "3Ajeeb" to mean "how fantastic, how strange, who amazing..." but mainly to denote a mixture of awe, perhaps some fear, most certainly amazement with a touch of curiousity... hence... our choice of "WONDROUS" ...)

                    In volume 3 of that famous book that, most probably practically no one will ever read, Jesus Christ discusses Gandhi. We will soon make that available to our esteemed readers.
                    Last edited by Daheshville; 12-26-2007, 05:22 AM.

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